PORTS RELEASE DETAILED ZERO-EMISSION TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP


PORTS RELEASE DETAILED ZERO-EMISSION TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP

New Report Identifies Framework for Future Developments

SAN PEDRO, Calif. — August 22, 2011 — The Port of Los Angeles and the Port of Long Beach have released a report that establishes a framework for future identification, development, and testing of non-polluting technologies for moving cargo.

The "Roadmap for Moving Forward with Zero Emissions Technologies at the Ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles – Technical Report" is a system for evaluating various methods of transport that produce no air pollution at the tailpipe.

An overview of the Roadmap was presented to a joint meeting of the Long Beach and Los Angeles boards of harbor commissioners on July 7, 2011. The boards received the overview document and provided guidance for moving forward with zero-emission technologies. Port staff used that guidance to complete the more detailed Roadmap Technical Report. Also, the boards directed ports' staff to come back in October 2011 with a proposal for a zero-emission project targeting rail and more information on the process and structure for evaluating and selecting additional zero-emission projects.

Click here to see the archived webcast of the July 7 Special Board Workshop.

The ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach are the busiest container seaports in North America. The two ports combined move more than $350 billion worth of goods and materials annually and sustain hundreds of thousands of jobs in Southern California.

The Port of Los Angeles is America’s premier port and has a strong commitment to developing innovative strategic and sustainable operations that benefit the economy as well as the quality of life for the region and the nation it serves.  As the leading seaport in North America in terms of shipping container volume and cargo value, the Port generates more than 830,000 regional jobs and $35 billion in annual wages and tax revenues.  A proprietary department of the City of Los Angeles, the Port is self-supporting and does not receive taxpayer dollars.

The Port of Los Angeles – A cleaner port.  A brighter future.